Weekend Link-Out: Fascist Art

January 3, 2014


"Am Letzten Linie" by Franz Eichhorst  (b. September 7, 1885 in Berlin, died April 30, 1948, Innsbruck) was a German painter, engraver and illustrator, one of a number of German artists known for his war paintings supporting the NSDP.

“Am Letzten Linie” by Franz Eichhorst
(b. September 7, 1885 in Berlin, died April 30, 1948, Innsbruck) was a German painter, engraver and illustrator, one of a number of German artists known for his war paintings supporting the NSDP.

Matt Heimbach’s piece on Starship Troopers got me thinking about fascism in art in general, not just science fiction.

As Matt notes, the term “fascist” is thrown around a lot, and even people who identify as fascist often seem to have different ideas of what it is. Ergo, you will have to forgive a little if my list includes things you don’t consider fascist, because rest assured, someone does. Regardless, below are some talking points:

– Straw Dogs, the 1971 version directed by Sam Peckinpah, not the 2009 remake. Famous film critic Pauline Kael called it, “the first American film that is a fascist work of art.” Additionally, Sam Francis seemed to have had a bit of a soft spot for Peckinpah films. (The preview on YouTube can be found here, and trust me, you can find the whole thing online.)

 

– Charles Krafft. Describing his art is quite difficult, but his website can be found here and speaks for itself. What he believes and whether or not he is a fascist is also a difficult topic, for polar opposite perspectives on him, check out this smear piece from one of America’s most left-wing newspapers, and this interview with Mr. Krafft conducted by our friends at Counter-Currents.

– Futurism. For all the talk of right-wingers never producing art, it should be noted that an entire genre of painting was invented and populated almost exclusively by self-identifying old-school fascists. (For the record, there was also Futurist music, literature, etc, but the movement was mainly in painting.)

– Vorticism. As Futurism spread from Italy into other parts of Europe, it naturally evolved and from it came the almost entirely British wave of “Vorticism.” Ezra Pound (who we can agree was a Fascist, right?) liked this movement a great deal, writing an essay praising it. (Like with Futurism, Vorticism was predominantly in painting, but not exclusively.)

– Pulp fascism. This is not a specific or easy-to-single out genre, but we are getting there. The late Jonathan Bowden in particular was interested in it, and I believe the next issue of Radix, should it ever be released, will be dedicated to the topic. Here is a transcribed speech by Mr. Bowden on the topic, and should you want to really dive in, there is a book as well.

As Neo-Con William Bennett would say, have fun flirting with fascism.

Local Solutions to the Globalist Problem Forums Weekend Link-Out: Fascist Art

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